Tuesday, May 25, 2004

Today's Good News

Today's good news comes directly from the George W. Bush re-election website. The site breaks down the recent Washington Times/ABC news poll that showed a drop in the president's over all approval rating. Although this as pect of the poll was highlighted in the news, other numbers that help to tell the entire story of how the candidates are stacking up were not publicized. The following is a summary from georgewbush.com:

Since the general election began in earnest after Senator Kerry all but clinched the Democratic nomination (March 2), the movement between the Washington Post/ABC News polls of March and May is promising. Since March, Senator Kerry has suffered deterioration in nearly every key leadership attribute, while President Bush has stayed the same or increased.

Today, the race is dead even, just as we have maintained that it will roughly stay until the Democratic convention.

President Bush has cut Kerry’s advantage on the economy by 7 points, and gained 7 points against Kerry on who the public trusts to handle Iraq.

Since March, Kerry has lost 23 points on the attribute of “honest and trustworthy,” 18 points on “strong leader,” and 15 points on “understands the problems of people like you.” President Bush’s ratings on these attributes have remained stable since March.

Furthermore:

President Bush has a 60-point advantage over Senator Kerry on who “takes a position and sticks with it.”
President Bush has a 17-point advantage on who “can be trusted in a crisis.”
President Bush has a 16-point advantage on making “the country safer and more secure."


See the whole article here.

Every recent poll has shown a drop in President Bush's approval rating, but they have also shown something else. As President Bush'd approval rating drops, John Kerry is unable to capitalize. Even typically reliable conservative columnists, such as Mort Kondracke have fallen into the trap of trying to predict this election using factors that have been used in past elections, such as the incumbants approval rating at a given period time before the election. This election will be decided on events that have yet to happen, such as the discovery of a large cache of WMD in Iraq, the capture of a major Al-Queda leader, the continuing growth of the economy, and whether or not the terrorists are able to strike on American soil. The drop in approval ratings can only be expected given the continuous media onslaught against the President. In the past few months the American people have endured the release of anti-Bush books by Paul O'Neill, Richard Clarke, Anthony Zinni, John Dean, Michael Moore, Al Franken, and a gaggle of other venom filled "pundits". The news media has relentlessly covered the Abu-Ghraib prison scandal and has dutifully followed the Democrats in their slanderous implications that Don Rumsfeld may have ordered the abuse, or that the abuse was "inevitable given the administration's flagrant disregard for international law". The death of American soldiers is treated as a political issue, to the point of a major media outlet allowing it's premier anchor to read the names of every soldier killed during prime time. The slaughter of Nick Berg, the discovery of weapons of mass destruction, the fantastic news on the battle field from such cities such as Nadjaf and Falujah, the rebuilt infrastructure, and the relative peace in 98% of the country of Iraq have been downplayed or ignored entirely. Less than three years after September 11, the media declined to broadcast a speech in which a war time President outlines in detail the transfer of sovereignty to a country that has never known self rule.

The election will be hard fought, and there is no guarantee that President Bush will win re-election. He faces more opposition from different fronts than any incumbant in history, and he faces a media that is determined to show every develpment in the worst possible light. Constantly unfolding events in Iraq and the economy will do more to determine the outcome of the election than any number of dollars spent on campaign ads. We must hold tight, not waver in our support and make sure that the voter turn out in November is as high as it has ever been.